The Shepherdess Of Rolleboise By Daniel Ridgway Knight, Oil Painting

The Shepherdess Of Rolleboise By Daniel Ridgway Knight, Oil Painting

Daniel Ridgway Knight (1839-1924): The Shepherdess of Rolleboise, 1896, oil on canvas, 172.7 x 128.2 cm, Brooklyn Museum, New York City

A dreamy mood prevails in this dignified image of a French shepherdess. The pastoral setting provides a poetic backdrop to her youth and beauty, creating a picture that erases the social realities of peasant life. Daniel Ridgway Knight was well aware of this painting’s potential for success when it debuted at the Paris Salon in 1896; it combined the silvery gray palette and romanticized peasant subject matter that were then popular in Europe.

Source: The Shepherdess Of Rolleboise By Daniel Ridgway Knight, Oil Painting

The Madonna Of The Pinks By Raphael, Oil Painting

The Madonna Of The Pinks By Raphael, Oil Painting

“The Madonna of Rosa” by Raphael depicts the Virgin Mary playing with the Christ child and giving him carnations. The Italian title is the Madonna of the Carnation. The botanical name of these flowers is Dianthus, which means “flower of God” in Greek. The sunny landscape through the arched window shows a ruined building that symbolizes the collapse of the pagan world at the birth of Christ. The dimly lit room image shows the influence of Dutch art on this painting.

This masterpiece is a relatively small devotion painted for Christian contemplation, and its owner could have held the painting in his hand. Raphael has transformed this familiar theme from the earlier formal, rigid images of earlier traditions into a new approach to celebrate the tender feelings between a young mother and her child.

Source: The Madonna Of The Pinks By Raphael, Oil Painting

The Lady’s Last Stake by William Hogarth, Oil Painting

The Lady’s Last Stake by William Hogarth, Oil Painting

The last post of William Hogarth’s lady shows the moment when the woman has to make a fateful decision to be ruined financially or morally. The painting depicts a playing man and a woman playing piquet at a table near an open fire in an elegant room. The woman has just lost her jewels and her money to the man, an army officer. He offers to play another card game, and when she wins, he returns her fortune in his hat. but if she loses, she has to accept him as her lover.

The woman holds the edge of the fire screen while thinking about her options. On the floor lies a discarded letter from her husband, who sends her money. it is addressed to Charlotte and signed Townly. The painting is full of symbolism that alludes to the fateful decision of the woman.

Source: The Lady’s Last Stake by William Hogarth, Oil Painting

In Summer By Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Oil Painting

In Summer By Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Oil Painting

“In the Summer” by Pierre-Auguste Renoir is a portrait of the twenty-year-old Lise Tréhot, who was Renoir’s companion from about 1866 to 1871. He painted her at least 23 times, including Lise with a 1867 painted parasol Renoir’s first major critical success at the Paris Salon in 1868. This success inspired Renoir to paint her again, this time in a more informal and intimate style.

The portrait shows a young woman in casual clothes sitting in a chair with lots of green. Lise is carefully crafted, but the background is roughly sketched with bold strokes of color in broad brushstrokes suggesting sunlit leaves. A thin red hair band holds her hair back from her face, and wavy strands fall loosely over her shoulders. Her arms are in her lap, with a few green leaves in her right hand. Lise has a distant expression and looks into the distance.

Lise Tréhot (1848-1922) was a French art model who posed for Renoir during his early salon period from 1866 to 1872. She was the model for almost all of Renoir’s work with female figures at the time. Tréhot later married Georges Brière de l’Isle in 1883 and raised four children.

Source: In Summer By Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Oil Painting

The Virgin and Child By Master Of The Clarisse

The Virgin and Child By Master Of The Clarisse

“The Virgin and the Child” of the Master of Clarisse was influenced by Byzantine icons and shows the Virgin and Child along with other Christian images. The surrounding pictures show the salvation of man through Christ, the Annunciation and the Crucifixion. On both sides is the Last Judgment with trumpeting angels calling people from their graves. This icon was probably made for an individual for private worship.

The artist is called “Master of Clarisse” and refers to an anonymous painter, who was named after a painting of the “Virgin and Child on the throne”, which is now in the Clarisse Monastery in Siena. He worked in the last third of the 13th century, when the influence of Byzantine icons on Sienese painting was strong.

The virgin and the child

The liturgy, which represents Mary as a powerful advocate, was brought from the Greek to the Latin tradition in the 8th century. With the increasing popularity of the cult of the Virgin, medieval art gained in importance. The term “Madonna” or “Madonna and Child” is used for certain works of Italian art. A “Madonna” can alternatively be called “Virgin” or “Our Lady.”

The earliest depictions of mother and child were developed in the Eastern Empire. Byzantine examples show the enthroned Madonna, who even wears the closed Byzantine crown with pearl crust and pendant and on whose lap stands the Christ Child.

Source: The Virgin and Child By Master Of The Clarisse